post conference exhaustion.

green suit

The conference was better than fantastic, but it was a full on three days. The first day went form 8.30am to 5.45 pm, not counting having to get there early to wade through the thousands to register.

I was solo, and it was great, as I didn’t have to worry about anyone else. If I wanted to sit quietly in a break I could, or if a session wasn’t what i expected I could move to another one easily.

I did meet a couple of librarians that I had been to PD with recently, one I had sat with for an entire day recently. I ended up sitting with her and a few of her colleagues during the first session with Sugata Mitra, but I walked out a different way to the morning tea break and made myself singular after that.

Except people kept attaching themselves to me, which was nice, I suppose, but… One woman kept commenting through a session to the point of irritation and I started calling her “Chatty Cathy” in my head. She was also one of those people who kept making excuses for why she wasn’t doing things, and using her age as an excuse. No excuse at all when it comes to technology. We can do it if we want. I left her in my wake at first opportunity.

The food was incredible, with sumptuous morning and afternoon teas of slices, muffins, danishes. Lunch was always a choice of salads, and not just lettuce and tomato salads, but grain salads, pastas, pumpkin and sweet potato salads, or hot dishes such as curries, fish, hot pastas, roast potatoes and more. There was one morning, the second when our group arrived to find all the food was gone, and we ll twittered our disappointment. It did not happen again.

The other key speakers were Anthony Salcito from Microsoft Education, Sir Ken Robinson, the curriculum creativity expert, whom we all adored, and also Ian Jukes of the 21st Century Fluency Project. Big hitters. At question time I think just about every presenter was asked to speak to our Federal and State Government Education Ministers and ask them to stop using teaching and education as a political football.

Strangely enough, pandering to the voting parent is not meeting the needs of a 21st century child. Institutional models of education like a production line no longer educates our students for today’s world.

Off the soap box, or at least I will leave that until another post! I returned to school on Friday, to be teased by fellow teachers that I had been on holiday, but I shared my notes and I think they can see that the days were filled from start to end. I have learned to much, and have so many ideas, little steps, that I want to implement. Our library shall be a space of creative enchantment.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “post conference exhaustion.

  1. I used to go to an annual conference for my work. I always went alone which I found easier. The first session was at 7 a.m. and the day ended around 6 p.m. I could wander in and out of sessions which I loved and for lunch you got a lunch box with a choice of 2 different sandwiches. It was great. I could go outside and eat under the trees. I brought back some great ideas that we used and always thought it was well worth the money.

    Like

  2. I agree, going solo you get so much more out of most things. We live across the canyon from an elementary school, which is one of the top rated schools here. However, due to the Common Core curriculum, parents are either sending children to private schools or homeschooling in growing numbers. I hope our state ops out of Common Core soon.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s