Family rescue

Sunday morning, Mr FD and I packed our box of goodies and drove over to Sister and BIL’s house. There we found BIL sitting in the warm sunshine, watching Sister, his older sister and her husband (both about 80!) energetically pruning the garden in preparation for the new spring growth.

We filled their freezer with our meals, and then shared a up of coffee with them. It was, as Hangaku Gozen commented to my previous post, a family effort to say ,“I will take care of you. I cherish you and you can always count on me to keep you safe and healthy.” We are also trying to share the load with my sister.

After our visit, Mr FD and I felt that we needed something to life our spirits a little before returning home, so we set out to have a Sunday drive in the country, which is easy when you live in the country!

The valley where we live is bounded by the Great Dividing Range. Our house is on the very edge of the Liverpool Range. The valley is a very fertile farming area on a flood plain, and the reason why we flood. Our drive showed us just how badly the land had been scoured by the January floods.The rain runs down from the mountains into the narrow mountain streams to merge with the country creeks and then onto the Bremer and Brisbane rivers. A vast volume of water flows down those mountain streams.

We had it in the back of our minds, to find the farm where my grandparents lived when I was a small child, but as it is over 40 years since I was there, and even the country changes over time, I wasn’t able to navigate the way. Next time we shall take sister and BIL with us, as sister being 8 years old than I, is sure to have a clearer memory of the area.

The drive did bring back so many memories or Sunday drives with my family, stopping to paddle in mountain streams and to picnic on creek banks. In those days we thought nothing of swimming in local creeks, today we would never think of it as pesticides and fertilizers have contaminated the waters.

country stream, south east Queensland, Australia

country stream, south east Queensland, Australia

Mulgowie 3

a very odd local who was intent on taking photos of the underneath of the tree - perhaps planning to move in and live there sometime...

a very odd local who was intent on taking photos of the underneath of the tree – perhaps planning to move in and live there sometime…

what the local loved

what the local loved

A distant view of Castle Mountain

A distant view of Castle Mountain

not a Dalek - an old piece of farm machinery now a mail box! Any suggestions what it was originally?

not a Dalek – an old piece of farm machinery now a mail box! Any suggestions what it was originally?

more the local style for mail boxes!

more the local style for mail boxes!

By this time, my stomach was telling me it wasn’t enjoying itself any longer, and with no picnic repast to feast upon, it was time to turn for home, leaving us more roads to travel another day.

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3 thoughts on “Family rescue

  1. I am sorry about your bil’s illness. It is never easy to face a loved one in pain. But it is such a blessing that you are around for your sister and bil.
    Lovely photos.

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  2. Very heartwarming story FD, and photographs remind me of being carted around the Australian countryside for picnics when Iwas a kid. A few years ago I went back to find the country house I was raised in but it had disappeared….now just a sheep paddock. A little sad.

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  3. It seems a shame that you can’t just wade in the creek without fear of pesticides and other agricultural runoff. We had the same problem in rural Minnesota, where you would see these lovely little springs and creeks bubbling through a pasture, with signs posted sternly warning you not to drink the water or swim in it.

    Thank you for quoting me: I am glad you liked it, though again it was some food writer (cannot recall her name! early onset Alzheimer’s, blargh!) who expressed those sentiments, and I was just paraphrasing her. I do think cooking for someone is the kindest thing you can do for someone who is in bad straits. I remember when my husband was sick the many casseroles and platters of food we received from friends, neighbors, and even strangers who just wanted to help. The other things—get-well cards, religious tracts, comforting bricabrac, I scarcely remember now.

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